Ships Heraldry

Crests and badges of the Fleet and Fleet Air Arm
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jbryce1437
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Re: Ships Heraldry

Unread post by jbryce1437 » Mon Jul 22, 2019 12:46 pm

Looks like the badge on the island shows the Prince of Wales's crest, which only forms part of the ships crest. I believe the ships crest for her will remain unchanged.

Jim
HMS Raleigh 1963 , HMS Collingwood 1963 & 67 , HMS Ark Royal 1964-7, HMS Undaunted 1968-71, HMS Victory (Fleet Maintenance Group) 1971-72, HMS Exmouth 1972-74
JEM, EM, OEM, LOEM, POOEL
Then 28 years in the Fire Brigade
Retired since 2002

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Pelican
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Re: Ships Heraldry

Unread post by Pelican » Mon Jul 22, 2019 4:12 pm

No doubt we will find out when we see images of the Senior Rates bar, special whiskey, own label beer [both welsh?] the cake, goody bags etc.
HMS Pelican 1938 - 1958 GGCV L86 U86 F86 What I Have I Hold ~ A wonderful bird is the Pelican its beak can hold more than its belly can.

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Little h
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Re: Ships Heraldry

Unread post by Little h » Thu Jul 25, 2019 10:59 am

Little h wrote:
Sun Jul 21, 2019 7:43 pm
Seen on Twitter a few moments ago ... Note the comments!!!


NavyLookout Retweeted

Seb H
@sebh1981

Ohhhh @HMSPWLS is taking shape. Dare I say I prefer her crest on the island?!?! 🇬🇧⚓️👊🏻

@UKDefJournal @NavyLookout

---------------------------------------------------------------

Seems like the badge of the Prince of Wales was lifted from the centre of St. George Cross in the ship's badge to produce a variation of:-

Badge_of_the_Prince_of_Wales.svg.png

NavyLookout
@NavyLookout
2h2 hours ago

Stunning new funnel badges now fitted to HMS Prince of Wales @HMSPWLS
EATrgqiXYAM3yJj.jpg
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Little h

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ivorthediver
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Re: Ships Heraldry

Unread post by ivorthediver » Thu Jul 25, 2019 4:59 pm

Well despite my name I was born in London , so not Welsh , but spent my formative years in Swansea none the less , so I think its correct and should have been at the naming ceremony ...... ;)
"What Ever Floats your Boat"

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Pelican
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Re: Ships Heraldry

Unread post by Pelican » Fri Jan 17, 2020 6:32 pm

Grey Funnel Line added a new photo to the album Naval Interest.
Ships Badges

The Royal Navy assigns badges to every ship, submarine, squadron and shore establishment. Prior to the age of steam ships, ships were identified by their figurehead. With the removal of the figurehead, ships badges and mottos were created to graphically represent the ships. The official process for creating the badge was initiated by Charles ffoulkes after World War One who was appointed as the Admiralty Advisor on Heraldry. Soon after his appointment The Ships' Badges Committee was established. This was amalgamated in 1983 with the Ships' Names Committee (founded in 1913) to create the Ships' Names and Badges Committee. The Naval Crown adorns the top of all the badges. The frame is gold rope. Originally, different classes of ships had different shapes, but currently all ships and submarines have a circular design. Shore establishments have an offset square design.

During the Age of Sail, ships were identified by figureheads and gilded carvings. However, the extravagance of these decorations began to reach the point of flamboyance, and an Admiralty directive in the early 18th century restricted the amount that could be spent, and eventually banned it outright.

Ships' badges first appeared in the 1850s, as identification markings on the stationery used by some Royal Navy ships. These marks were quickly used to mark the boats assigned to a ship, to aid crew in finding their boat at a dark or crowded wharf. The creation of badges was haphazard, and eventually came into use for the ships themselves.

Testing was carried out to ensure that the badges were designed appropriately to identify ships. Cardboard mockups were created, gilded, and installed on a police launch, which was observed on patrol of the Thames by a captured German submarine moored outside Westminster Palace. It was decided to use different shapes to identify different types of vessel: circles for battleships, pentagons for cruisers, 'U'-shaped shields for destroyers, and diamonds for auxiliary units, including depot ships, small war vessels, and aircraft carriers.

In 1940, the designs for all ships were standardised to a circular design. The standardisation was primarily due to wartime shortages, although another factor was to eliminate difficulties caused when a ship was commissioned with a previously-used name, but was of a different type to the previous ship, requiring the badge to be redesigned for the new shape. At the same time, the use of scaled-down badges for a ship's boats was suspended, and as of yet has not been resumed.

After the war, the pentagonal badge shape was assigned to Royal Fleet Auxiliary vessels, and the diamond to commissioned shore bases. Before World War Two, the design of badges for ships in other Commonwealth navies was the responsibility of the Royal Navy Ships' Badge Committee, but this responsibility was assigned to the relevant nations after the war.

Ships' badges are reused along with the ship name. When the Queen approves the name of a new ship she will also approve the new ship's badge, which may have changed if the shape needs to change.
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HMS Pelican 1938 - 1958 GGCV L86 U86 F86 What I Have I Hold ~ A wonderful bird is the Pelican its beak can hold more than its belly can.

Culverin
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Re: Ships Heraldry

Unread post by Culverin » Mon May 18, 2020 8:59 pm

In previous posts to identify the shapes of grey navy badges, using the term diamond is incorrect as it is an offset square.

Previous post also well illustrates how the shape was altered if a ship perpetuated the same name. 2nd row down and 2nd from right is the offset square for Glowworm, this was originally designed for the Insect class gunboat whilst the later G class destroyer was changed to the shield shape.

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ivorthediver
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Re: Ships Heraldry

Unread post by ivorthediver » Tue May 19, 2020 9:57 pm

We'll you live and learn , thanks for that distinction , and glad to see that you have also been to the museum at Greenwich , a very much enjoyed venue for us to , and will return again to complete the trip soon I hope
"What Ever Floats your Boat"

timlewin
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Re: Ships Heraldry

Unread post by timlewin » Mon Sep 07, 2020 6:11 am

with the news of the scrapping of dear old Hermes, subsequently INS Viraat, I have written to the Indian Naval Attache in London to suggest that before she is completely recycled they might copy what we did with the steel from the old mast of Belfast and cast a series of steel crests of the ship, in both guises, for sale to former members of the ship's company, or as VIP gifts, for the benefit of the Indian Naval Benevolent Fund.

I will keep you al posted as to response.

If you go back a page you can see the steel crest of Belfast we made.

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ivorthediver
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Re: Ships Heraldry

Unread post by ivorthediver » Tue Sep 08, 2020 7:08 pm

A Worthy sudjestion Tim and worth the effort you would think .....
"What Ever Floats your Boat"

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