RNAS Culdrose - HMS Seahawk

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Pelican
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RNAS Culdrose - HMS Seahawk

Unread post by Pelican » Fri Jan 17, 2020 10:08 pm

Helicopter In Flight Refuelling - HIFR
Royal Naval Air Station Culdrose
Vital training on the RNAS Culdrose ‘Dummy Deck’ with students being taught how to safely refuel a helicopter whilst in the hover.

Royal Navy Aircrew, Aircraft Handlers and Air Engineering teams must all be able to conduct Helicopter In Flight Refuelling (HIFR). This type of refuel may occur if an aircraft requires fuel but a ship does not have a flight deck, or if the flight deck is full or damaged.

Here are the steps...

The winch cable is lowered from the helicopter by an aircrew member, and earthed at ground level with a metal hook attached to a cable which is, in turn, attached to a metal plate in contact with the deck. This ensures that any static electricity, which has built up in the helicopter during flight, is discharged to avoid the risk of fire or electrical arcing.

The fuel line is then winched up to the aircraft door adjacent to the fuelling point. Another aircrew member connects an earth plug attached to the fuel line to the earth socket on the aircraft, then connects the fuel line.

Fuelling can now safely begin, hand signals from the aircraft indicate when the fuel flow should start and stop – when complete the process is reversed and the fuel line is returned safely to the deck.

None of this is easy under the downwash from a Merlin helicopter, especially for the air engineers holding the hose, as the video shows!

Video at - https://www.facebook.com/rnasculdrose/v ... 590542501/
HMS Pelican 1938 - 1958 GGCV L86 U86 F86 What I Have I Hold ~ A wonderful bird is the Pelican its beak can hold more than its belly can.

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Pelican
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Re: RNAS Culdrose - HMS Seahawk

Unread post by Pelican » Thu Jan 23, 2020 5:10 pm

RNAS Culdrose

Ever wondered what’s hiding under the nose of our Merlin MkII helicopters? The answer: Although they are primarily sub hunters, they also perform search and rescue and have, under their nose, the antenna for picking up distress beacons 824NAS RoyalNavy funfacts.
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HMS Pelican 1938 - 1958 GGCV L86 U86 F86 What I Have I Hold ~ A wonderful bird is the Pelican its beak can hold more than its belly can.

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Pelican
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Re: RNAS Culdrose - HMS Seahawk

Unread post by Pelican » Thu Jan 23, 2020 6:53 pm

Katrina Coatsworth‎ - "Sadly lost my Mother-in-law this week but found these great pictures tonight - made me smile ."
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HMS Pelican 1938 - 1958 GGCV L86 U86 F86 What I Have I Hold ~ A wonderful bird is the Pelican its beak can hold more than its belly can.

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Pelican
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Re: RNAS Culdrose - HMS Seahawk

Unread post by Pelican » Thu Jul 16, 2020 5:35 pm

Royal Naval Air Station Culdrose

As 'Table Top' exercises go - this has to be the best 'table' ever to hold discussions over!

Here's the HMS Queen Elizabeth Flight Deck Management Team discussing their forthcoming GROUPEX embarkation - an important milestone for carrier strike aviation, and one that RNAS Culdrose personnel will play a key role in, both in the air and on the deck.

The flight deck team held their discussions at our Royal Naval School of Flight Deck Operations, using equipment that we use to train Aircraft Handlers who will safely manage the flight decks of aircraft carriers, HMS Queen Elizabeth and HMS Prince of Wales.

Petty Officer Liam Forgeron (nicknamed 'Four Jets are On') from Helston, said: ''The QEC model at the Culdrose Flight Deck School is a fantastic interactive tool that has allowed us to rehearse a crucial stage of Carrier Aviation, testing concepts and expanding our capabilities in delivering carrier strike aviation globally any time, any place. I'm really excited to be operating with Fixed Wing aircraft from both 617 and the US Marine Corps, placing us back in the game with potent F35 power.''

More photos at:
https://www.facebook.com/pg/rnasculdros ... e_internal
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HMS Pelican 1938 - 1958 GGCV L86 U86 F86 What I Have I Hold ~ A wonderful bird is the Pelican its beak can hold more than its belly can.

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Little h
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Re: RNAS Culdrose - HMS Seahawk

Unread post by Little h » Fri Jul 31, 2020 2:53 am

NavyLookout
@NavyLookout
4 Hawk Jets of 736 Naval Air Squadron to operate from Newquay airport while maintenance carried out on @RNASCuldrose
runway.

Will exercise with and RAF Typhoons and @HMSDefender
in South Coast Exercise Areas

https://devonlive.com/news/devon-news/r ... e-43745384

___________________________________________________________________________

RNAS Culdrose Retweeted
dan c
@tomcam38
4 hawks from @RNASCuldrose
popping in to @Newquay_Airport
@CornwallLive
I believe they will be here for most of next week due to some work being done on the runway at culdrose.

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Royal Navy warship leaves Plymouth as RAF readies for dogfight with 'enemy' jets

HMS Defender recently fired off 20,000 rounds during a weapons test as part of her Fleet Operational Sea Training
By Max ChannonLive and Trending Editor
15:25, 30 JUL 2020Updated19:58, 30 JUL 2020


A Royal Navy Type 45 Destroyer has left Plymouth after firing off 20,000 rounds during a weapons test.

It comes as the Royal Air Force (RAF) readies itself for a dogfight against 'enemy jets' in the skies above Devon and Cornwall as part of a training exercise featuring a Type 45 Destroyer.

HMS Defender has been a familiar sight in The Sound this summer, while she completes Fleet Operational Sea Training at HMNB Devonport ahead of returning to active service following post-deployment maintenance. The Type 45 Destroyer, which the Royal Navy says is one of most advanced warships ever constructed, spent 222 days in the Gulf escorting merchant shipping and safeguarding UK interests in the Middle East during the height of the Iran crisis.

The Portsmouth-based warship sailed out of Plymouth Sound yesterday evening, while a Royal Navy helicopter swooped overhead - with an aircrewman waving at well-wishers and bystanders on The Hoe and along Plymouth's waterfront.

Royal Navy sources told Plymouth Live the warship was still undergoing FOST, despite suggestions on social medial she was being deployed.

Earlier in the week, HMS Defender tested her weaponry - firing off an incredible 20,000 rounds from her 4.5 inch Mark 8 Naval Gun, 30mm medium-calibre gun systems, Phalanx short-range machine guns and mini-guns.

The warship, primarily designed for anti-aircraft and anti-missile warfare, is also armed with a Sea Viper surface-to-air missile system and a helicopter weapons system - which also had a run out.

One exercise saw the embarked Wildcat Flight from RNAS Yeovilton based 815 Naval Air Squadron take to the skies to "find, fix and strike enemy ships" after Defender "splashed" raiding 'enemy fighters' - which are usually Hawks from RNAS Culdrose Cornwall.

The tables are set to be turned next week, when the Culdose Hawks will become the hunted. They will once again try to "attack " warships - and a Type 45 will co-ordinate an RAF Typhoon in the skies above Devon and Cornwall, in bid to fend them off..

A Royal Navy spokesperson said: "The black jets are relocating to Cornwall Airport Newquay for one week from next Monday, August 3. Typically, they are based at Royal Naval Air Station Culdrose at Helston, but the military airfield’s runways will be closed for a few days for essential maintenance.

"The Hawks are still needed for training however so they have used the opportunity to move up to Newquay. A small team of aircrew and engineers are taking four jets to the airport."


"The Hawks play the part of enemy aircraft or incoming missiles to test Royal Navy and NATO ships. The ships’ companies must work together to manoeuvre their vessels and deploy their anti-air defences to fend off the hostile threat.

Read more Royal Navy news here

"The jets also test the abilities of fighter controllers to understand and manage the fast-moving battle-space and coordinate intercepting aircraft.

"On the Wednesday they will take part in an exercise ranging across Devon and Cornwall, attempting to evade a Typhoon jet, which will be coordinated from a Royal Navy type-45 destroyer."

Source; Plymouth Herald
Little h

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